← Older posts

Duodenoscope Transmitted Infections Put Patients’ Health at Risk

Duodenoscopes are medical devices used during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) to help health care providers diagnose and treat serious conditions and diseases, such as cancer or gallstones in the pancreas or bile duct. These flexible, lighted tubes are threaded into the top of the small intestine via the mouth, throat, and stomach. They are effective » Read More


Family of Neil Armstrong Awarded in Medical Malpractice Lawsuit

Famed astronaut, Neil Armstrong, is best known for being the first person to walk on the moon. Recently, Armstrong’s family received media attention after settling a medical malpractice case against a hospital in a wrongful death lawsuit. According to Armstrong’s family, the 82-year-old former astronaut, Korean War veteran, and Congressional Space Medal of Honor recipient » Read More


Poor Communication Among Healthcare Professionals Lead to Catheter Infections

Catheters are often used during a surgical procedure or when patients are unable to urinate. Indwelling catheters drain urine from the bladder into a bag outside the body. These devices are widely used in hospitals, but if they are not properly monitored by the healthcare professionals responsible for a patient’s care, they can cause infections. » Read More


Maryland Hospital Grades

According to the latest hospital safety ratings released by the Leapfrog Group, 10 hospitals in Maryland received an A grade, based on the number of errors, accidents, injuries, and infections that were reported. However, five hospitals received a D grade, 14 received a C grade, and 11 were given B grades. Fortunately, none of the » Read More


Military Medical Malpractice Lawsuit Challenges the Feres Doctrine

In March 2014, a Navy lieutenant who was employed as a nurse at the Naval Hospital Bremerton in Washington died during childbirth. The pregnant Naval officer went into labor, but suffered complications which caused excessive bleeding. Unfortunately, she died shortly after giving birth. The deceased’s husband, who is a former Coast Guard officer, filed a » Read More


Financial Incentives Do Not Improve Hospital Performance

Hospitals are constantly looking for new and innovative ways to reduce costs while improving the quality of patient care. Value-based incentive programs (VBIPs) have been used to improve quality and reduce costs by providing financial rewards to hospitals who demonstrate proven improvements, and penalties to those who do not. However, a recent study by the » Read More


Alarm Fatigue Among Healthcare Providers Jeopardizes Patient Safety

When a patient is admitted to the hospital, oftentimes, they are hooked up to a range of machines that monitor heart rate, oxygen levels, and other important vital signs. Many of the medical devices used to monitor a patient’s health are equipped with alarms that will alert the healthcare provider if something is wrong. While » Read More


Johns Hopkins Medical Centers Failing Their Own Safety Measures

The Johns Hopkins Medical Centers possess a reputation for patient safety excellence. The network of medical centers within their system consists of four centers in Maryland, and two others based in Washington, D.C. and St. Petersburg, Florida. Their seemingly stellar reputation stems from the creation of a medical checklist that reportedly saved many lives. Doctors » Read More


Bi-Annual Safety Report Reveals Top Grade Maryland Hospitals

Twice a year, the non-profit company, Leapfrog, releases its safety ratings report for hospitals across the country. The company uses a range of sources to measure safety, including the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Leapfrog Hospital Survey. While only 32 percent of the 2,600 hospitals » Read More


Hospital Infections Put Stroke Patients at Risk for Readmission

According to a recently published article, stroke patients who have developed an infection are more likely to be readmitted to the hospital compared to other patients. The researchers found that urinary tract infections were among the most common types of infections, but others also contributed to the fact that stroke patients have a 20 percent » Read More