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Hospital Infections Put Stroke Patients at Risk for Readmission

According to a recently published article, stroke patients who have developed an infection are more likely to be readmitted to the hospital compared to other patients. The researchers found that urinary tract infections were among the most common types of infections, but others also contributed to the fact that stroke patients have a 20 percent » Read More


Mothers’ Health Often Overlooked During Childbirth  

In the United States alone, close to four million babies are born every year. Many women go into labor on or close to their due date and deliver their baby without any health complications. However, the childbirth process can be unpredictable, and things can go wrong, putting the health of the baby and the mother » Read More


Raising Awareness on the Dangers of Sepsis  

Sepsis is an extremely dangerous, potentially life-threatening condition that claims the lives of 258,000 Americans each year. If there is a serious infection somewhere in the body, the immune system can go into overdrive trying to fight the infection. In some cases, rather than fighting the infection, the immune system releases toxic chemicals into the » Read More


Health Implications Due to the Lack of Female Emergency Room Doctors

According to research from the American Heart Association, heart disease is the number one cause of fatality in men and women in the United States. Unfortunately, women are less likely to survive a heart attack than men. A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota examined the health outcomes of female heart » Read More


Direct Transport to Specialized Care Hospitals

If someone is suffering from a heart attack, immediate access to life-saving medical care is crucial. In some states, emergency medical services (EMS) are required to transport the patient to the closest hospital for treatment. However, if that facility does not offer the specialized treatment needed, the patient’s condition may worsen. Other states allow EMS » Read More


Maryland Hospitals Have Reduced Errors

Hospitals strive to provide exceptional care to all patients. After being ranked in the bottom five of the country’s safest hospitals, the state of Maryland has taken proactive steps to improve their safety rating by reducing medical errors and preventing injuries and infections. According to a safety assessment by the Leapfrog Group, the changes have » Read More


Cell Phones in Operating Rooms

Research shows that cell phone use in operating rooms is not uncommon. In a report prepared by Kaiser Health News and the Washington Post, and published by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, medical personnel told reporters that they observed colleagues using their cell phones for things that were unrelated to the procedure taking place. Specifically, » Read More


Cameras in the Operating Room

When something goes wrong during a surgical operation, the only people who can describe what happened are those who were present in the operating room. This is usually limited to members of the medical team, who may be the very people responsible for surgical errors or negligence. However, new legislation might change this. A bill » Read More


Sick Healthcare Professionals Put Patients at Risk

When people acquire an illness, they trust doctors and nurses to help them recover. When healthcare professionals (HCPs) acquire illnesses themselves, they are not able to provide the care their patients need. Hospitals and other healthcare facilities must have systems in place to ensure that sick workers can stay home and avoid infecting patients. However, » Read More


Lack of Response to Safety Issues in Hospitals

According to a recent article published by USA Today, hospital safety issues are not always addressed in a timely or productive manner. Depending on the specific issue, patients can be at risk for a wide range of illnesses and infections. Even when safety issues are officially reported, hospitals rarely face consequences that are serious enough » Read More